Bradley's Carputer 2

This is it! This one is actually going in my car.

Dashboard Lower console, with cupholders The dash, removed from my car Lower part of the console
This carputer is going in my new 2003 Kia Optima, which has only 5100 miles on it. I borrowed a couple of pics from Kia. I hope they don't mind. This is the dash. This is the lower part of the console, with the cup holders under the hydraulic door. Here is my dash, on my kitchen table. And here's the lower part of the console.
the screw hole on the bottom of the Xenarc monitor fits a camera tripod perfectly Of course, the tripod won't work in my car, so I ordered something else A trip to the hardware store and $5 yielded a hodge-podge of plumbing parts This is actually a brass fitting to go on the end of a pipe to connect a length of copper tubing.  The large washers will go above and below the plastic where I drill the mounting hole to add support
I figured out that the screw hole on the bottom of the Xenarc monitor fits a camera tripod perfectly. Of course, the tripod won't work in my car, so I ordered something else. I'll just have to figure out a way to mount it when it arrives. A trip to the hardware store and $5 yielded a hodge-podge of plumbing parts. This is actually a brass fitting to go on the end of a pipe to connect a length of copper tubing. The large washers will go above and below the plastic where I drill the mounting hole to add support.
The pipe cap screwed onto the end of the pipe.  I think that too much of the threads show Drill a hole in the cap and add a 1/4 - 20 bolt and nut View from inside the cap.  There is still plenty of room to screw the pipe in I cut off enough of the threads so that they don't show when screwed into the cap
The pipe cap screwed onto the end of the pipe. I think that too much of the threads show. Drill a hole in the cap and add a 1/4 - 20 bolt and nut. View from inside the cap. There is still plenty of room to screw the pipe in. I cut off enough of the threads so that they don't show when screwed into the cap.
Those pieces of plumbing turned into a monitor mount A 1/2 inch hole drilled in the cup holder, a large washer on each side, and the brass fitting tightened down securelye A slot dremeled in the front of the pipe conceals the cables Stealth when I want it
Those pieces of plumbing turned into a monitor mount. A 1/2 inch hole drilled in the cup holder, a large washer on each side, and the brass fitting tightened down securely. I screwed the pipe in tight, and marked it for the slot I dremeled in the front of it to conceal the cables. A slot cut in the side of the cup holder passes the cables into the belly of the console. Here's the lower console with the monitor mounted. All I have to do to conceal the fact that there is a computer in my car is unplug the monitor, unscrew the pipe, and put it in the glovebox. The cables will coil up in the cup holder, and the door will latch closed.
You can't even see in here when sitting in the car Old junk cases to the rescue A little more flexibility I just drilled an appropriately-placed hole in the cap
I desperately looked for a place to mount the IR receiver, but it was too large to fit in the ashtray, or anywhere els, for that matter. But with the console removed, I saw something that I had never seen while sitting in the car. I always keep the cables from old cases. This time it paid off tremendously. That's right, that is a turbo switch connector from and old 486 case. I desoldered the actual IR receiver from the board and it fit the turbo swith connector perfectly! The length of cable on the turbo switch connector gave me plenty of room to play. I just drilled an appropriately-placed hole in the cap...
I used a larger bit to make a countersink for better visibility of the receiver... You won't be able to see this at all in the car, beacuse it's in the shadows The itty-bitty D-Link DWL-120+ 22Mbps USB WiFi adapter The Anaba 12VDC powered FM transmitter
I used a larger bit to make a countersink for better visibility of the receiver... And hot-glued it it. You won't be able to see this at all in the car, beacuse it's in the shadows. The itty-bitty D-Link DWL-120+ 22Mbps USB WiFi adapter. Just wait until you see the place I found to put this inside the dash! I chose it for it's size, and for its ability to run at 22Mbps when used in conjunction with other 22Mbps D-Link devices. (I also bought a D-Link DI-614+ Wireless Broadband Router. The Anaba 12VDC powered FM transmitter. I bought this at my local stereo shop (Audiomasters) for $60.
This is the bucket that goes under the hinged armrest I decided to mount the CDRW/DVD drive in there Just 3 holes to mount the drive The adapter has a screw at each end to secure it to the slim drive
This is the bucket that goes under the hinged armrest. I decided to mount the CDRW/DVD drive in there. All I had to do was cut a hole in the bottom for the adapter to connect through, and 2 small slots for the cable ties to hold it to the side (I know this is strange, but it has no screw holes on its bottom). The adapter has a screw at each end to secure it to the slim drive.
Here's the mobo mounted to a piece of metal that I cut from an old case The hard drive and USB / Firewire port assembly are mounted on the bottom USB / Firewire assembly Opus Solutions automotive ITX PSU
Here's the mobo mounted to a piece of metal that I cut from an old case. The hard drive and USB / Firewire port assembly are mounted on the bottom. Here's a detail view of how I mounted the USB / Firewire assembly. I cut off the part that you would normall put the screw through in a regular case, and used 4 cable ties to secure it. You can also see my mobo mounting method here. The Opus Solutions automotive ITX PSU with cables attached.
Opus Solutions PSU with cables attached Tiny USB hub Red / black 18-gauge speaker wire to be used for power 6-foot audio cable
The Opus Solutions PSU with cables attached. A quick trip to Radio Shack and $30 got me this tiny USB hub, ... a roll of red / black 18-gauge speaker wire to be used for power, ... and a 6-foot audio cable that is 4 feet longer than I need it to be.
The network adapter inside the dash The network adapter inside the dash The FM transmitter is velcro-ed to the passenger-side inside the console I picked up this handy little USB 2.0 6-in-1 flash card reader from Dealsonic
I tested the network adapter inside the dash, and it still worked great. I velcro-ed it to the top of the air ducts. The sapphire GPS wound up right next to this. I forgot to take a picture of it, so you'll just have to trust me. It also works just fine inside the dash. The FM transmitter is velcro-ed to the passenger-side inside the console. I picked up this handy little USB 2.0 6-in-1 flash card reader from Dealsonic.
The area under the armrest before... The area under the armrest after, with the motherboard installed The area under the cupholders before... The area under the cupholders after, with the psu and tiny USB hub installed
The area under the armrest before... The area under the armrest after, with the motherboard installed. The area under the cupholders before... The area under the cupholders after, with the psu and tiny USB hub installed.
The bucket in place The monitor mount installed The monitor installed and the carputer running! The finished carputer
The bucket in place. In there I put the CDRW / DVD, the flash card reader, the firewire cable (to connect my mini-DV camera), and a PS/2 keyboard cable (just in case). The monitor mount installed. The monitor installed and the carputer running! The finished carputer.

Thanks for visiting my site. I'll be happy to answer any questions you may have. My email address is (remove the NOSPAM) bradleyNO@SPAMbradleyjacobs.com

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